Spring is Here

It’s impossible, I believe, to finish this sentence in a manner that pleases everyone: “The hardest thing about the pandemic has been _______.” 

People have lost so much, and those losses are, in many ways, both alike and different for everyone.  Lives have been lost, health has been lost, jobs have been lost, and families and friends have been kept apart for the common good.  In addition to these few examples, there are many other situations, some of them unique, but most of them shared in some manner by others.

That said, the last loss I mentioned–the loss of community–is starting to make a comeback.  Sometimes I think it’s growing stronger because of the shared sense of responsibility to do it in a way that seems right.

There are, of course, a variety of relatively new ways to communicate through the use of technology, but the last few days have reminded me how some of the older methods are still valuable.

I’ve seen people sitting together outside.  That’s a lot easier here in the south, but I’ve heard accounts of it occurring in the colder climes.  If we want to be together, we’ll figure out how to do it.

I’ve seen people engage in outdoor activities.  The hiking trails in my area haven’t seen this much use in, well, perhaps forever. Bicycle stores and outdoor equipment stores are seeing more business.

In my limited experience with them, even online groups are seeing their sense of community growing through offline avenues.  I’ve sent and received cards and letters (one just yesterday!) from people with whom my relationship would probably have stayed virtual were it not for a heightened sense of connection brought on by our shared experiences. 

This first day of spring is, metaphorically speaking, not just a time of renewal after a long season of meteorological winter.  These days hold a sense of hope that a figurative winter is ending as well.  May that be so. 

15 thoughts on “Spring is Here”

  1. “These days hold a sense of hope that a figurative winter is ending as well.” Beautiful piece, Tim.
    My OLW this year is CONNECTION because despite how connected everyone was in 2020, I wanted it to be more intentional. With meaning, if you will. You are correct that it’s becoming easier, and I can see community connections becoming more evident as the days go by.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That was very insightful Tim and I agree — I think we’re seeing new communities flourish and old communities flourish in different ways. It’s very hopeful which seems perfect for spring. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. This was a really fitting post for this milestone in our shared experience of this pandemic. It made me think about how I would fill in that blank – I think it’s all some form of loss. Here’s hoping we find ways to build in the midst of loss this spring.

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  4. May it be so, indeed. The last year has been a LONG winter of the spirit. I know that loss of community was probably one of the hardest for me, too. But we can see signs of spring as you mention. We can only hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This is an optimistic, contemplative post. Yes, as you said, “If we want to be together, we’ll figure out how to do it.” That has been so true for me during the pandemic. We found a way to safely travel and visit my aging parents for five days who live 900 miles away. I found a way to continue walking with a friend, once a week after taking a break from it in the early days of the pandemic. We resumed in August and have seen each other nearly every week for a walk outside since. I even found a way to see one of my coffee-clatch friends – another intense individual with whom I have a lot in common. And, once it warms up, I hope to see a few more of my more philosophical friends (one is our former district math coordinator) when we can sit outside, enjoy coffee and solve the problems of the local educational world! LOL. Yes, community is important and it’s so fitting it is returning at this time of year!

    Liked by 1 person

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