Colors

In many ways, probably too many to count, I’m a conservative person.  Okay, given the times, I suppose I should clarify that I’m not politically conservative, at least not as much as I once was.  Depending on the day and the situation, I’m a right- or left-leaning moderate.  Mostly left, lately.  You know, this slice of life has absolutely nothing to do with politics, yet there it is: I felt the need to clarify my usage of a word.  These are strange days we’re living in, and I’m not sure I like all aspects of them.

So, back to me being a conservative person.  Let’s go with the “slow to change/cautious about change” meaning of the word.

Recently, I built some stairs coming off of our side porch leading down into the back yard.  There’s nothing particularly special about the stairs, other than the amount of planning time that went into them. By some estimates, some six or seven years went into the process.

Anyway, the steps are done.  It’s been a few weeks, so they’re almost ready to paint (pressure treated lumber needs time to thoroughly dry).  

Normally, I’d be looking at a white paint.  Not “white,” but one of the “off whites” that one typically sees on a set of steps.  In lieu of white, I might just leave them natural.  I like natural wood, and “natural” is what one goes with when what they really want is an “I didn’t have to paint” color.

Anyway, let’s back up a few weeks.  I’d just finished the steps, but knew I didn’t have to worry about painting them for a while.  The treatment in the  lumber wasn’t dry, and even if it was, I live in Alabama.  You don’t paint outside during an Alabama summer unless you want to wait until an Alabama fall for it to no longer be sticky.

I was out and about that day, and found myself walking into a local business that had a small picket fence around some mechanical thingy just outside the door. 

The fence was blue.

It wasn’t a dark blue, nor was it a robin’s egg or sky blue.  I don’t know what the painter called it, but it was a shade typically seen in a “beach” palette of colors. 

Not a coral, not a turquoise, and definitely–most definitely–not me. No, it wasn’t.

But that color stuck with me.  

And it stuck with me, over the weeks since I built those steps.

That color is not me, or is it?  The rest of the woodwork on my house: White.  Other projects I’ve built: Subdued Earth tones, including (of course) “natural.”

Yet, that color stuck with me.

At the local big box home center, it’s called “Cool Rain.”  I’m not sure I can believe it, but I’ve got a quart.  I’ll let you know how it comes out.

8 Comments

  1. I love this post! When I was painting a few rooms in my house I watched a few instructional videos online, and this one piece of advice from Martha Stewart stuck with me. As she fearlessly rolled a bright green onto a wall, she chimed “It’s only paint! You can always go over it!” That has stuck with me. It’s not permanent and if you don’t like it, well, you can change it!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “Cool Rain” sounds like an excellent color at the end of a hot summer. I love that your naturally conservative palette is changing – and I kind of love that you include your politics in here because, in a way, their shifting shape seems related to how you allow yourself to be enticed by a new color. Would that we could all allow ourselves to give something new at least a quart’s worth of possibility.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Amanda, I think it’s an excellent color and it’s growing on me more and more. I don’t usually bring politics or current events into my writing (well, obviously personal current events, but you know what I mean), but as other things are changing, that might too. The last sentence of your comment resonates with me so much: I want to allow the possibility of change into my life, and a paint color is just the start. Thank you for reading, and for your comments–I appreciate them!

      Like

  3. I agree with the phrase you mentioned! I just don’t know what will come my way next, but I want to be open to it. Thank you for reading and for your comments!

    Like

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